chef brendan keegan

Brasserie Brightwell serves food all day and into the night in a lively, casual French atmosphere. Join us for lunch and dinner prepared by Brasserie Brightwell Executive Chef/ Owner Brendan Keegan and his culinary staff.

Chef Keegan, a graduate of L'Academie de Cuisine in Washington, has a resume that includes NYC stints at restaurant Prune, the iconic East Village restaurant owned by mentor Gabrielle Hamilton, who in 2011, won BEST CHEF NYC by the James Beard Foundation. CHEF also earned spots in the kitchens of innovative Washington D.C. restaurants, Kinkeads, a true American brasserie which celebrated all things seafood, and 1789, a classic French inspired restaurant.

Chef Keegan later migrated to the Eastern Shore of Maryland, where he became Executive Chef at O’Leary’s Seafood Restaurant in Annapolis, Md. In 2006, longtime St. Michaels favorite 208 Talbot was purchased by Chef Brendan Keegan ( later sold ), who improved the restaurant’s already-stellar reputation by expertly executing his “new American” cuisine that includes flavors and techniques from Asia, Europe, the South, and his home state of Maryland with more than a touch of class and high-quality ingredients. The result was a resounding success with area diners, who have now voted him “Best Chef” for three years running.

In April 2010, Chef Keegan teamed with with DC businessman and Talbot County resident Bob Yabroff to open Brasserie Brightwell . The restaurant takes its name from Keegan's maternal grandmother, Jessie Brightwell, "a watermelon farmer's daughter from Georgia" who made her way to Washington and taught her young grandson, Brendan, his love of cooking.

Brightwell’s became an instant success, and according to Washington Post Food Critic, Tom Sietsama “nothing small leaves the kitchen at Brasserie Brightwell in Easton, Md. Ask for escargots and out comes a fleet of snails, drenched in garlicky herb sauce, on rafts of toasted bread. An order of roast chicken is enough to feed two. Its tender flesh and basting of butter make the entree easy to dispatch. Mr. Sietsama describes the Brasserie Brightwell space as, “there's almost as much room outside (70 seats) as inside (85 seats) the restaurant. Big and light-filled, the interior, which features a semicircular raw bar, looks nothing like the auto garage it once was. If you happen to be in or near Easton, it's a pleasant place to refuel and relax”.

Zagat touts Brasserie Brightwell as “French and American "food with flair" – including "a wide variety of petits plats" plus items from a raw bar and wood-fire grill – is served up at this "friendly" Easton brasserie whose "garage-chic" setting gets a lot of adaptive reuse out of its bay doors that open to a "sprawling patio" and outside bar; the "joie de vivre" is further expressed by an "ample" selection of wine and beer, all "reasonably" priced.

Chef Keegan invites you to discover his charming restaurant in the heart of historic Easton, a simple French kitchen whose loyal patrons fondly refer to as “The Brass”. Hope to see you soon.

Washington Post Food Critic, Tom Sietsama “nothing small leaves the kitchen at Brasserie Brightwell in Easton, Md. Ask for escargots and out comes a fleet of snails, drenched in garlicky herb sauce, on rafts of toasted bread. An order of roast chicken is enough to feed two. Its tender flesh and basting of butter make the entree easy to dispatch. Mr. Sietsama describes the Brasserie Brightwell space as, “there's almost as much room outside (70 seats) as inside (85 seats) the restaurant. Big and light-filled, the interior, which features a semicircular raw bar, looks nothing like the auto garage it once was. If you happen to be in or near Easton, it's a pleasant place to refuel and relax”.
X